Welcome to Linguis Europae, the EUC's language blog!

Linguis Europae is dedicated to a range of topics involving official state, regional, and minority languages in the EU. Posts are written in five languages by UI students and faculty! Check back regularly for updates!

Bridging the Gap: Language and Community in Action in East Central Illinois

Skye Mclean discusses the East Central Illinois Refugee Mutual Assistance Center (ECRIMAC), which provides services essential to refugee and immigrant resettlement in East-Central Illinois and aids in the exchange and preservation of their respective cultures.

Place and Space: Another Perspective on Crimea

Senior Andrey Starosin offers his perspective on the current events taking place in Crimea.

French Professor Revamps Course on "Language and Minorities in Europe"

Linguis Europae's own Zsuzsanna Fagyal and her course "Languages and Minorities in Europe" were featured in a recent issue of the School of Literatures, Cultures, and Linguistics.

Un'Ode al "Dialàtt Bulgnaiś": An Ode to the Bolgnese Dialect

Kaitlyn Russell muses on her fondness for the Italian dialect, Bolognese.

Wednesday, March 6, 2013

Alsacian: A language with many identities

By Christy Nichols and Jessica Nicholas
Translated from the French by Jessica Nicholas

Christy Nichols was an undergraduate major in biology, minoring in French, when she composed parts of this blog piece on the local language of Alsace-Lorraine, a region of France, in spring 2012 in the European Union Center’s ‘Language and Minorities in Europe (418)’course.

Jessica Nicholas is a PhD Candidate in the Department of French, specializing in French Linguistics. She has a particular interest in language ideologies, variation, and education. She is one of the associate editors of the EUC blog site Linguis Europae, and shaped Christy’s blog entry into its current form.


The French region of Alsace-Lorraine is one of the most important territories in the European Union, because the region shares its borders with Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany and Switzerland, and it hosts dozens of international organizations. It possesses a tumultuous history, torn for centuries between Germany and France. These two founding powers of the European Unions have left their indelible marks on this region of France, whose hybrid Franco-Germanic culture could even induce President Sarkozy to make a mistake. During a speech in 2011 addressing rural France, he attributed this region to Germany! (Click on the video below to hear him say it!)


 It is good to note here that the ancient history of the region has long witnessed cultural blending.  The simultaneous presence of the Romans and Germanic tribes was attested in the area until the departure of the Romans in the 5th century. In 870, Alsace became a German possession. During the 17th and 18th centuries, France annexed Strasbourg, the regional capital, and the territories of Lorraine and the Moselle. Most of Alsace, including schools, was administratively French but culturally German until 1859. After the Franco-Prussian War in 1871, Alsace became German once again. Until the end of the First World War in 1918, Alsace-Lorraine was part of the German Empire. In 1940, Nazi Germany annexed it for the Third Reich, and the territory did not return to France until the Liberation in 1945.

The end of the war in 1945 marked the low point in Franco-German relations, and the French government forbade the use of the German language in schools. It would be another twenty years before the first sign of recognition of the regional local culture in Alsace. Although the Loi Deixonne, in 1951, opened the path to the teaching of Breton, Basque, Occitan and Catalan in France, Germanic speech did not receive the same recognition as the other regional languages right away after the war. It wasn’t until 1985 that France recognized this dialect of German as one of its regional languages, strongly supported by a new generation of Alsatians who have a much more positive attitude towards their Franco-Germanic regional identity than that of their parents’ generation.

At the beginning of the 1990s, Alsatian primary schools were authorized to begin French-German bilingual instruction. Schools normally are French-medium schools in Alsace.  Parents who want their children to be schooled in a bilingual program have to demonstrate to the local education authorities that there is a large enough group of families willing to switch to bilingual education.

An additional complication comes from the fact that the local language is not a standardized language with a set orthography and grammar books with rules that can be taught to schoolchildren.  Instruction in German- when it is offered- is in High German, and thus in the prestige variety of German that is spoken and written throughout German-speaking Europe. It is therefore unsurprising that, since the introduction of bilingual schools, those teachers recruited locally in Alsace do not always know how to speak High German, which causes problems in the profession.

Amid all these changes, Alsatians have always continued to speak Alsatian outside schools and formal contexts. Nonetheless, the forced francization after the wars triggered a decline of the Alsatian language. There are regionalist movements that have taken as their mission the protection of the local language. Among these, the regionalist movement “l’Alsace d’abord” (“Alsace First”) is a political party which seeks political and economic autonomy. The partisans in this party support the idea of a bilingual region, with French and Alsatian as official languages.

Although Alsace is an extremely important territory for the European Union, and in spite of the fact that the Alsatian language constitutes a direct link between the two founding countries of the Union, the Alsatian language has no official status in Alsace-Lorraine. The French government signed the European Charter of Regional or Minority Languages in 1992, but has not yet ratified it. Despite the addition of a special clause to the Constitution in 2008, recognizing regional languages as being part of the heritage of the Republic, the language of the Republic remains French, forbidding the division of the people. Without changing the Constitution (or its interpretation), it is unlikely that France will ratify this Charter anytime soon. Parliament recently voted for ratification, but it did not succeed in gaining the required number of votes.

So what, then, is the future of Alsatian, the language spoken in the region?

There is now an increased interest in the Alsatian language. The recognition of regional cultures as a treasure of the cultural heritage of France in the Constitution (loi constitutionnelle du 23 juillet 2008) has undoubtedly contributed to the increase in preservation of regional languages. One can see more and more bilingual street signs in Strasbourg.
   
 Alsatian is now recognized as a language of France, and high school students can choose to study it.  But all the advantages that Alsatian receives currently in Alsace can be set back by gaffes like that of Sarkozy, who affirmed himself to be in Germany during his trip to Alsace.  Granted, it was an easy slip of the tongue since “Alsace” and “Allemagne” start with the same sounds, but the fact remains that the territory’s French identity is in question. This could push Alsatians to develop the necessity to prove their French identity, as they did after the war, and to abandon their regional language.  In preserving Alsatian, on the contrary, they could choose to put more emphasis on their pride of being Alsatian, preserving the language as a vestige of local culture.

We anticipate now the future of Alsatian in Alsace. Most people who speak the dialect are older, and the transmission of the language in the home has been in decline since the war.  Alsatian is threatened on the German and French sides by two powerful languages that are spoken, written, and read in institutions of government and in the European Union. The linguistic policy of France and of the European Union in the next few decades will determine if Alsatian will survive in the few private domains that are still reserved for it.

Thank you to the following people for their editing:
Zsuzsanna Fagyal, Stéphanie Gaillard, Jui Namjoshi, Alessia Zulato, Laura Poulousky

Read this post in French: http://eucenterillinois-language.blogspot.com/2013/03/lalsacien-une-langue-plusieurs-identites.html



Sources:

Atchley, Sharon. "The French Region of Alsace." French at a Touch. Independent
Contractor of Nexicon, 18 Apr. 2012. Web. 30 Apr. 2012. http://www.french-at-a-touch.com/French_Regions/Alsace/alsace_1.htm.

Huck, Dominique, Arlette Bothorel-Witz, and Anemone Geiger-Jaillet. Report on the
Linguistic Situation in ALSACE. Report on the Linguistic Situation in ALSACE.
Language Bridges. Web. 20 Apr. 2012. http://ala.u-strasbg.fr/documents/Publication-%20situation%20linguistique%20-%20version%20anglaise.pdf.

Kozhemyakov, Alexey.  "The European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages 1992 – 2012, 20 years after: Achievements and New Challenges." Presentation at Symposium for the 20th anniversary of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 5 November, 2012.

"Languages in Alsace." Getalsaced.com. Getalsaced.com, 2007. Web. 20 Apr. 2012. http://www.getalsaced.com/languages-in-alsace.html.

Images:

Map of Alsace, http://claude.behr.pagesperso-orange.fr/flyfishing/images/France.gif, accessed 3/6/13.

"Do you speak Alsatian?" http://blog.unsri-heimet.eu/archives/interdiction-de-l%E2%80%99alsacien-par-le-pole-emploi-de-guebwiller-en-2008/, accessed 3/6/13.

"Soiree Alsacienne," http://louisdressner.com/date/2012/4/10/109/, accessed 3/6/13.

"Cat Street," http://www.lexiophiles.com/english/france-%E2%80%93-belgium-bilingual-road-signs, accessed 3/6/13.



Share/Bookmark

L’alsacien : une langue à plusieurs identités

Par Christy Nichols et Jessica Nicholas

Christy Nichols était étudiante de premier cycle,  avec une spécialisation en biologie et une concentration en français, quand elle a écrit des parties de cette entrée de blog au sujet de la langue régionale de l’Alsace-Lorraine, une région de la France.  C’était en printemps 2012 pour le cours du Centre de l’Union Européenne, « Langues Minoritaires et Régionales en Europe ».

Jessica Nicholas, est étudiante de doctorat dans le Département de Français, avec une spécialisation en linguistique française.  Elle a un intérêt particulier en idéologie, variation, et formation de la langue.  Elle est une des éditrices associées du site-web de blog du Centre de l’Union Européenne, Linguis Europae.  Elle a formulé l’entrée de blog de Christy à son état actuel.

La région française de l’Alsace-Lorraine est l’un des territoires les plus importants de l’Union Européenne, parce que la région partage des frontières avec la Belgique, le Luxembourg, l’Allemagne, et la Suisse et elle accueille des dizaines d’organisations internationales.  Elle possède une histoire tumultueuse, déchirée durant des siècles entre l’Allemagne et la France. Ces deux puissances fondatrices de l’Union Européenne ont donc laissé leurs empreintes indélébiles sur cette région de la France, dont la culture hybride franco-germanique a pu même induire en erreur le Président Nicolas Sarkozy qui, lors d’un discours de 2011 adressé à la France rurale, a attribué cette région à l’Allemagne! (Cliquez sur le vidéo pour entendre cette erreur!)


Il convient de noter que l’histoire ancienne de cette région témoigne déjà d’un mélange culturel dans la mesure où la présence simultanée des Romains et des tribus germaniques est attestée sur son territoire depuis avant l’arrivée des Romains, et ce jusqu’au départ des Romains au 5ème siècle.  En 870, l’Alsace devient une possession allemande.  Pendant le 17ème et le 18ème siècle, la France annexe Strasbourg, la capitale régionale, et les territoires de la Lorraine et de la Moselle.  La plus grande partie de l’Alsace, y compris les écoles, étaient administrativement françaises mais culturellement allemandes jusqu’en 1859.  Après la guerre franco-prussienne en 1871, l’Alsace devient à nouveau allemande.  Jusqu’à la fin de la Première Guerre mondiale en 1918, l’Alsace-Lorraine faisait donc partie de l’Empire allemand. En 1940, l’Allemagne nazie l’annexe au Troisième Reich, et le territoire ne revient à la France qu’avec la Libération en 1945.

La fin de la guerre en1945 marque le point bas des relations franco-allemandes et le gouvernement français interdit l’usage de la langue allemande à l’école. Il faut attendre vingt ans pour le premier signe de reconnaissance de la culture régionale locale en Alsace. Alors que la Loi Deixonne, dès 1951, ouvre la voie à l’enseignement du breton, du basque, de l’occitan et du catalan en France, le parler germanique de l’Alsace-Lorraine, tâché des souvenirs du nazisme et de l’occupation allemande ne reçoit pas la même reconnaissance que les autres langues régionales après la guerre. Ce n’est qu’en 1985 que la France reconnaît ce dialecte de l’allemand comme l’une de ses langues régionales, fortement soutenue par une nouvelle génération d’Alsaciens qui a une attitude beaucoup plus positive envers son identité régionale franco-germanique que la génération de ses parents.

Au début des années 1990, les écoles primaires alsaciennes ont été autorisées à commencer une instruction bilingue français-allemand. La langue de l’instruction en Alsace est le français. Les parents voulant scolariser leurs enfants à une école bilingue doivent apporter la preuve à l’Académie de Strasbourg qu’il y a suffisamment de familles intéressées à l’enseignement bilingue.

Une complication supplémentaire provient du fait que la langue locale n’est pas une langue standardisée avec une orthographe et des livres de grammaire avec des règles à enseigner aux écoliers.  L’instruction en allemand, lorsqu’elle est offerte, est en haut allemand, donc en allemand de prestige écrit et lu à travers l’Europe allemanophone. Il n’est donc guère étonnant que lors de l’introduction des écoles bilingues, les professeurs recrutés localement en Alsace ne savent pas toujours parler le haut allemand, ce qui cause des problèmes dans la profession.

Pendant tous ces changements, les Alsaciens ont toujours continué de parler l’alsacien en dehors des écoles et des contextes formels. Néanmoins, la francisation forcée après les guerres a entraîné le déclin de la langue alsacienne. Ce sont les mouvements régionalistes qui ont pris pour mission de protéger la langue  locale.  Parmi eux, le mouvement régionaliste « l’Alsace d’abord », est un parti politique qui est à la recherche d’autonomie politique et économique. Les partisans de ce parti  soutiennent l’idée d’une région bilingue, avec le français et l’alsacien comme langues officielles. 

Bien que l’Alsace soit un territoire extrêmement important pour l’Union Européenne et le fait que la langue alsacienne constitue un lien culturel étroit entre deux pays fondateurs de l’Union, la langue alsacienne n’a pas de statut officiel en Alsace-Lorraine. Le gouvernement français a signé la Charte Européenne des Langues Régionales ou Minoritaires en 1992, mais il ne l’a pas encore ratifiée.  Malgré l’ajout d’une clause particulière à la Constitution en 2008, reconnaissant les langues régionales comme faisant partie du patrimoine de la République, la langue de la République demeure le français, interdisant la division du peuple.  Sans changer la Constitution (ou son interprétation), il est peu probable que la France ratifie bientôt cette Charte.  Le parlement a récemment voté pour la ratification, mais il n’a pas réussi à obtenir le numéro de votes requis.

Alors, quel avenir pour l’alsacien, la langue parlée dans la région ?

Il y a actuellement un regain d'intérêt pour la langue alsacienne. La reconnaissance des cultures régionales comme une richesse du patrimoine culturel de la France dans la Constitution (loi constitutionnelle du 23 juillet 2008) a sans doute contribué à l’essor de la préservation des langues régionales. On voit de plus en plus de noms de rues bilingues à Strasbourg.
   
L’alsacien est désormais reconnu comme une langue de France, et les étudiants au lycée peuvent choisir de l’étudier. Mais tous ces avantages que l’alsacien reçoit actuellement en Alsace pourraient être annulés par des gaffes comme celle de Nicolas Sarkozy, qui a affirmé d’être en Allemagne lors de son séjour en Alsace. Ce n’était qu’un lapsus, puisque « Alsace » et « Allemagne » commencent par les mêmes sons, mais l’identité française de la région est toujours sous question.  Cela pourrait pousser les Alsaciens à développer la nécessité de prouver leur identité française, comme ils l’avaient fait après la guerre, et donc d’abandonner leur langue régionale.   En préservant l’alsacien, au contraire, ils pourraient peut-être décider de mettre plus d’emphase sur leur fierté d’être alsacien, et préserver la langue comme un vestige de la culture locale.

On anticipe maintenant l’avenir de l’alsacien en Alsace.  La plupart des gens parlant le dialecte sont âgés et la transmission de la langue au sein des familles est en déclin depuis la guerre.  L‘alsacien est menacé des côtés allemand et français par deux langues puissantes parlées, écrites, et lues dans les institutions de l’état et de l’Union Européenne.  La politique linguistique de la France et de l’Union Européenne des prochaines décennies va déterminer si l’alsacien va survivre dans le peu de domaines privés qui lui sont encore réservés.

Thank you to the following people for their editing:
Zsuzsanna Fagyal, Stéphanie Gaillard, Jui Namjoshi, Alessia Zulato, Laura Poulousky

Read this post in English: http://eucenterillinois-language.blogspot.com/2013/03/alsacian-language-with-many-identities.html



Sources:

Atchley, Sharon. "The French Region of Alsace." French at a Touch. Independent
Contractor of Nexicon, 18 Apr. 2012. Web. 30 Apr. 2012. http://www.french-at-a-touch.com/French_Regions/Alsace/alsace_1.htm.

Huck, Dominique, Arlette Bothorel-Witz, and Anemone Geiger-Jaillet. Report on the
Linguistic Situation in ALSACE. Report on the Linguistic Situation in ALSACE.
Language Bridges. Web. 20 Apr. 2012. http://ala.u-strasbg.fr/documents/Publication-%20situation%20linguistique%20-%20version%20anglaise.pdf.

Kozhemyakov, Alexey.  "The European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages 1992 – 2012, 20 years after: Achievements and New Challenges." Presentation at Symposium for the 20th anniversary of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 5 November, 2012.

"Languages in Alsace." Getalsaced.com. Getalsaced.com, 2007. Web. 20 Apr. 2012. http://www.getalsaced.com/languages-in-alsace.html.

Images:

Map of Alsace, http://claude.behr.pagesperso-orange.fr/flyfishing/images/France.gif, accessed 3/6/13.

"Do you speak Alsatian?" http://blog.unsri-heimet.eu/archives/interdiction-de-l%E2%80%99alsacien-par-le-pole-emploi-de-guebwiller-en-2008/, accessed 3/6/13.

"Soiree Alsacienne," http://louisdressner.com/date/2012/4/10/109/, accessed 3/6/13.

"Cat Street," http://www.lexiophiles.com/english/france-%E2%80%93-belgium-bilingual-road-signs, accessed 3/6/13.



Share/Bookmark